Seeking Flexibility, Looking for Input

Guest post by DOE Chancellor of Public Schools Michael Grego

Florida has long embraced progressive reform efforts in education. We have not shied away from meaningful changes that ultimately prepare our students for what lies ahead in their paths – whether that is a successful career or challenging postsecondary work. This is one of the main reasons for us to apply for the flexibility waiver being offered by the U.S. Department of Education. While we at the Florida Department of Education prepare the application to submit, we are also seeking your input as well.

We continue to set high standards and want to align our accountability system with the federal requirements. By doing so, we hope to minimize the confusion that so many of our education stakeholders have expressed with schools that are graded A or B, but not able to show adequate progress according to the federal definitions.

Check out the resources at www.fldoe.org/esea and provide your comments through the email address and the online survey. Your feedback will be vital as we refine the framework to help our students further their education.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Seeking Flexibility, Looking for Input

  1. Me: A waiver allowing children to be left behind?!?! As in, “adapting to this child’s learning-style is too much of an inconvenience, so we want a loophole allowing us to just let this poor kid struggle alone until he finally gives up and just goes away”?! How dare you?!!! Do you think you are going to like it when your surgeon, pilot, structural engineer, and everyone else is dumb as dirt because they all got “left behind”??
    October 13 at 9:25am · Like

    Florida Department of Education: Thank you for your comments. Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson recently made clear in one of his blog posts that “Florida is neither waiving standards nor accountability”. By applying for the ESEA Waiver, our goal is to better align our state’s accountability system with the federal requirements so the performance of our schools is much clearer to parents. For instance, federal requirements presently do not account for the learning growth of every student, leading to situations where you have “A” and “B” graded schools considered failing by federal standards. If we are successful with this waiver we can address these types of limitations and better serve every one of our students.
    October 13 at 3:53pm · Like

    Me: Thank you for your response. Those schools are “still considered failing” because they are not meeting improvement standards in all subsets of students – specifically children with learning disabilities. This is just an excuse to ignore the children that need help THE MOST, and deny them the school choice options and tutoring waivers they are granted now.
    October 13 at 6:55pm · Like

    Me: What does Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson propose we do with the students who don’t learn in exactly the manner their teacher chooses to teach in? Fail them until they drop out?? You do understand that you are the Department of EDUCATION and not the Department of BABYSITTING, right? This state-backed attempt at circumventing our children’s Constitutional right to be educated is horrifying!
    October 13 at 7:28pm · Like

    • What I would like to know is: florida believes that cutting transportation to children that had previously taken advantage of placement at a higher performing school would save them monies under NCLB- ok I can understand that but explain .. why would they also take away school choice with out transportation for failing schools if that is not costing them anything? I am willing to transport my child where it may be that he gets a proper education why am I being denied that option?

  2. Pingback: State DOE wants flexibility in federal law, not lower standards – Hall Pass - Gainesville Sun - Gainesville, FL - Archive

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s